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Behind The Screen

17 Apr

This blog is a little different to my usual because it is being written with the intention of adding a link elsewhere to try and explain/highlight what has happened ‘behind the screen’ to bring a web page together.

As some may know I administrate, edit and manage a web site about a particular musician and have done for many many years. It is an on-going, complex, multi-layered learning experience that gathers information into one place. I do it for my own satisfaction, to have a one-stop place that collates his work, for the fans and those interested to visit. Yes, it costs me money, but what hobby doesn’t.

Recently he was interviewed by Dom Familaro for The Sessions Artist Series published to YouTube. If you are interested in the workings of the music industry, the various musicians that back, support, perform with many A-list names, perhaps you play an instrument, these interviews are entertaining and interesting to hear so many peoples different life stories, how music became their profession and where that profession has taken them and things they’ve learnt and experienced on the way. But I digress…..

The website has a few interview transcripts and it occurred to me that even though YouTube has the ‘captions’ option (akin to on the go subtitles in language of your choice), there is still a section of the world wide audience who are missing out, so I decided to transcribe the thirty-eight minute interview and find a way it can be translated, thus broadening it’s reach. Sounds reasonably straightforward, doesn’t it. Ha!

Step 1. Using a mix of shorthand, speed writing and longhand I begin taking down the dialogue. Gone are the days when I could audio-type thanks to my depleted dexterity. So it’s listen intently, stop video, write, reread, rewind and listen again, correct script, add punctuation. Continue to listen, pause it, write it down, check it, relisten to the passage, make corrections and proceed ….. you get the idea. It took a few days, working an hour or two per day.

Step 2. Thanks to my muscle disease rendering my fingers/hands/wrists so weak the easiest way to transcribe the written word is to use dictation, no more confidently typing at between 70-75 wpm for me anymore. I create a fresh document, hit the microphone and speak clearly, deciphering my scrawl as I go. Stopping after a couple of paragraphs to read over the dictation, correct the errors, add the punctuation, capitalise names etc. Hit save and carry on. It takes a couple of days but at the end there are nine pages of crisp type, each paragraph a persons dialogue, all checked, proofed and corrected.

Step 3. Now it gets a little technical because I need to add the HTML tags that make it show on the eventual web page. Each paragraph needs a <p> at the beginning. It makes visual sense to have the interviewers dialogue in a different colour to the interviewees, so I add a font=“colornumber” to those lines. I also have to add the speakers name to each paragraph to make it easier to follow who is saying or asking what. So that’s added, all in capitals for emphasise.

Step 4. Using a specific software program I create the webpage, it’s basic style set to match the myriad of pages already there. I add the techie bit of code to embed the YouTube video, making sure it sits comfortably and is the correct size. I add the tab heading and explanation. Then in chunks I add the coded interview transcription. Crossing my fingers I hit the ‘test’ function to see what it looks like as a web page. I am reasonably pleased with the result except the colour is way way off, neon lime green, the hex code is a shade of red! Hmm……that needs investigating, it works on other pages already published.

Step 5. Thanks to an excellent web site that walks you through, teaches and shows how to grapple with HTML coding I can put together the five or six lines of instruction to add a button to bring up a menu of languages that Google will then translate the whole page. Wow! I add it at the top of the transcription coding and hit ‘test’. It’s there, and what’s more……it works! Victory! By chance it answers my query about the text colour coding, I think the issue is that versions of HTML change things, and that’s what has happened here, the code for changing the font colour is now a script command within the <p> notation, so I will need to put together the new bit of code, then copy and paste it at the beginning of each of the interviewers dialogue.

Step 6. I confidently upload the new page to the server, add the link to the main media page so viewers can get to it and voila….well no, not quite yet, actually. I forgot the special text snaffoo, you see when you type characters like & ( ‘ ) “ and then copy/paste them into a coding page, things go a little bit odd, it turns a ‘ into ’ . So I need to go through the entire transcript and remove the gobbledygook and replace the appropriate punctuation mark.

Next time I am at my desk, I will have to go through the coding, change the font colour code and correct the ‘ (oh I hope the find and replace will help me). That a rough idea of what is involved for just one page. I intend to add the translation script to every page of the site, a mere thirty or so. Like the Forth Bridge, there is always something that needs working on to improve.

Link to the interview ….. The Sessions Artist Interview

Link to the website http://www.stcgibb.com

 
6 Comments

Posted by on April 17, 2020 in Music, people, Tech, Website

 

Tags: , , , ,

6 responses to “Behind The Screen

  1. deacongill

    April 18, 2020 at 2:09 pm

    I am soooo impressed! That’s one heck of a job, requiring great patience and even greater attention to detail. I too trained in shorthand and typing and have audiotyped in my time: I’ve also recorded interviews in Hausa and Romanian and then transcribed and translated them, so I have a very good idea of the immense amount of work involved. Hope you’re satisfied with the result, once you’ve ironed out those last few glitches.

    Liked by 1 person

     
    • AnneMarie

      April 18, 2020 at 2:13 pm

      Nowadays the sense of achievement and satisfaction is fleeting. I experienced similar with my Crosstitch projects, once they were completed, washed and pressed that was it my connection to the item seems to evaporate.

      Liked by 1 person

       
      • deacongill

        April 21, 2020 at 1:01 pm

        Actually that is a really interesting thought.

        Like

         
  2. menhir1

    April 20, 2020 at 4:26 pm

    It’s a lot of careful work, testing, replacing, re-doing. Will this incarnation live into the next O.S update do you think? All of that programming and website creation takes inordinate patience and a love for what you are structuring. Apart from O.S challenges, will there be room for input as further information comes to light?

    I was watching part of a tribute performance of the Gibb brothers the other night. Checked into Lulu’s connection as I remembered she had married and divorced one of them.

    xxxx

    Liked by 1 person

     
  3. snowbird

    April 22, 2020 at 11:15 pm

    I tip my cap to you!!!! But….my technophobe brain is in meltdown reading this! xxx

    Liked by 1 person

     
    • AnneMarie

      April 23, 2020 at 10:34 am

      I sometimes wonder if these technical challenges I find myself in are a little bit masochistic! I stubbornly will not be defeated!!

      Like

       

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